#ClosedButActive? An exhibition trying to find its voice during lockdown

This Insight looks at the temporary exhibition “We Capitalists. From Zero to Turbo” at the Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn, Germany, which was opened on 12 March 2020 and closed again two days later. The experience of lockdown was also sadly felt as a loss of voice, especially as the exhibition had the potential to serve as a meaningful commentary to aspects of the evolving COVID-19 crisis. This period of speechlessness clearly exemplified how exhibitions can or cannot be active, bringing the medium of the exhibition to its limits.

Who will deal with the underlying issues once the statues are out of sight?

Over the last weeks, activists in Europe and the US attacked statues of figures perceived to be representations of colonialism, imperialism, and racism. Such symbolic acts inspired similar protests across a wide variety of national communities – those involved citing a need for immediate justice and reparations for historical wrongdoings. But will removal and destruction of monuments result in necessary structural and systemic changes? This piece argues that reforms of social, punitive, and economic policy are necessary if we are to transform removal into something more than a Pyrrhic victory. The application of restorative justice that permeates all systems is required.

Equity, Empathy, and Ethics in Digital Heritage Practice and Research

“Equity, Empathy, and Ethics in Digital Heritage Practice and Research” is a joint project between the Institute for Cultural Practices and the School fo Social Sciences (University of Manchester), the iSchool, Faculty of Information (University of Toronto), The Manchester Museum, The Whitworth and the Museums and Heritage Services of the City of Toronto. It is funded by the Manchester-Toronto Research Fund.

Q: What, now, for public statues with racist, colonial, or imperial histories?

With Black Lives Matter protests and the toppling of the Colston statue still making headlines in the UK calls to do something about statues with racist or colonial histories grow ever more urgent. Options for dealing with these monuments are increasingly contested and […]